Monday, January 4, 2010

Buck Rogers In The 25th Century (Mego)



Buck Rogers in the 25th Century
Mego
1979

I vividly remember that we were in Bangladesh at the time. We three siblings would crowd around the small black and white TV in my sisters room and watch whatever shows her antenna could pick up. Buck Rogers, The Incredible Hulk, Knight Rider, The A-Team and all those other long forgotten shows of the very early 80's.

Despite being very, very young when these figures came out, I still somehow remember it all. It was Christmas. Granted I can't tell you which Christmas. But, it was Christmas. My brother, my sister and I were ripping packages open left and right as kids often do around this time of year. When all the paper had been gathered up by our mother, and all the pine needles from the tree had settled from being rustled back and forth by three kids underneath, we each found ourselves with a complete set of Buck Rogers in the 25th Century toys.

Though more popularly known for their 12" line of "dolls", Mego wanted to make the leap into 3 3/4" figures. Small action figures were the Hallmark of any toy line, and Mego not only met the challenge, they outdid themselves. The detail on the outfits is superb, and the design of Twiki all the way down to the tiny chest plate of Doctor Theopolis is incredibly accurate to the show. The packages themselves were quiet a bit of eye candy themselves.

One of the interesting things about the Buck Rogers line is that Mego was always strict about their anit-weapons policy in toys. Even though the figures had gun holsters, the guns were permanently molded to the figures legs rendering them simply part of the design.

There were only nine figures released in the series before the show went off the air and the line was cancelled. They included; Ardella, Buck Rogers, Draco, Draconian Guard, Dr. Huer, Killer Kane, Tiger Man, Twiki, and Wilma Deering.

A small selection of vehicles, as well as one playset, was made available. The molding and sculpting was not as precise in detail to the show as the figures, and for the most part, the ships were "blocky" feeling and left little to desire. It was abundantly clear that the figures themselves got all the attention from Mego, while the vehicles were more of an afterthought.

The large Star Fighter Command Center wasn't any better. Essentially molded to look like a flight deck, the toy was by far "interactive".

Despite the many flaws with the actual vehicles, the Buck Rogers toy line remains a strong collectible item on the secondary market. Fans of the series search high and low to complete a fully carded set of figures as well as a fully boxed set of vehicles. The show may be long gone, but the toys live on.

Click "HERE" to go back to the home page. For more posts related to this one, please click the labels below.

No comments:

Post a Comment

Thank you for taking the time to post a comment on this article. We ask that your comments be kept friendly in nature towards other readers who have commented, and please avoid using foul language as this is a family friendly site.

Disclaimer

All logos, products, names, and descriptions are the property of their respective copyright and trademark holders. No infringement is implied. Photographs and articles (unless otherwise noted) are copyright of The Toy Box, and may not be used without prior written consent. This website and its pages herein are designed for educational purposes only. No items shown are for sale.



Market prices fluctuate daily, and the prices as listed herein are not intended to be a set point, but rather a benchmark of where prices were noted at during the time period in which the article in question was written/posted. The value of any item shown here is always subject to change based on supply and demand, as well as seller/buyer preference. We are not affiliated with any buyers/sellers, and have no influence on prices set by secondary market dealers or individual sellers.